An appeal in favor of that class of Americans called by Lydia Maria Child

By Lydia Maria Child

Topics: Antislavery pursuits -- usa Notes: this is often an OCR reprint. there is quite a few typos or lacking textual content. There are not any illustrations or indexes. for those who purchase the overall Books version of this booklet you get unfastened trial entry to Million-Books.com the place you could choose between greater than one million books at no cost. it's also possible to preview the booklet there.

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August 19: Inaugurates "Letters from New-York" ("LNY") column in Standard. December: Publishes "The Quadroons" in Liberty Bell for 1842. 1842 December: Publishes "Slavery's Pleasant Homes" in Liberty Bell for 1843. 1843 May: Resigns from editorship of Standard after months of dissension over editorial policy and factionalism; resumes her literary career; DLC replaces her as editor in August, but resigns the following May. Page xvi Late August: Publishes Letters from New-York; first edition sold out by December, book goes through eleven editions.

In her preface Child subtly negotiates the transition from The Mother's Book and the Juvenile Miscellany to the Appeal. Addressing the audience that had hitherto revered her as a model for women and children, and speaking in the familiar tones of nineteenth-century womanhood, she implores it in the name of her past services to grant her a hearing on an admittedly unfeminine topic: Reader, I beseech you not to throw down this volume as soon as you have glanced at the title. Read it, if your prejudices will allow, for the very truth's sake:If I have the most trifling claims upon your good will, for an hour's amusement to yourself, or benefit to your children, read it for my sake:Read it, if it be merely to find fresh occasion to sneer at the vulgarity of the cause:Read it, from sheer curiosity to see what a woman (who had much better attend to her household concerns) will say upon such a subject:Read it, on any terms, and my purpose will be gained.

December: LMC publishes "The Black Saxons" in Liberty Bell for 1841. 1841 May: LMC moves to New York to edit National Anti-Slavery Standard for two years; boards with the Quaker Underground Railroad agent Isaac T. Hopper. August 19: Inaugurates "Letters from New-York" ("LNY") column in Standard. December: Publishes "The Quadroons" in Liberty Bell for 1842. 1842 December: Publishes "Slavery's Pleasant Homes" in Liberty Bell for 1843. 1843 May: Resigns from editorship of Standard after months of dissension over editorial policy and factionalism; resumes her literary career; DLC replaces her as editor in August, but resigns the following May.

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